Honeymilk: Sanguine Skies EP review

Honeymilk

Swedish alt-rock ensemble Honeymilk first came to life in September of 2012 after evolving from the band Urmas Plant, which had its own inception six years years earlier. A month after forming, the Stockholm based musicians released their debut single, “It Might Be”, to much praise both online and on radio. Inaugural album Lean on the Sun followed a year later and with the addition of a new drummer, their current lineup was complete by 2014.

Since coming together, the group have also toured extensively around both Europe and Britain, with a fresh string of UK dates set for the coming weeks. To go along with their upcoming shows, the trio have a brand new EP called Sanguine Skies.

It begins with the slow bass line of “Let’s Talk About Compassion” before erupting into boisterous instrumentation during the verse. Continuing to grow as the loud and lively chorus sets in, this energetic opener is packed full of merry riffs and fervent vocals that make for an easy listen. “A Scene in Between” trots out of its wake upon rousing guitars that establish an upbeat atmosphere and soon give way to a reserved but expressive melody. Featuring plenty of stirring instrumental arrangements, this infectious number remains a hive of activity and enthusiasm throughout its rather substantial six minute run time.

Title track “Sanguine Skies” charges forward rapidly, aided by a cheerful riff and vivacious vocals. It doesn’t mess around, rushing towards the finish line without wasting a moment. This allows for an absorbing undertaking that builds to a fine finish. “What Are We Gonna Do Now?” comes next, armed with a characterful drum beat that soon joins forces with purposeful guitars. Carrying a light, contented vibe, it bounces along determinedly through passionate vocals and instrumentation. As the end approaches, the riffs escalate to a furious pace, ensuring that things stay compelling right up until the final note.

Honeymilk have chosen an extremely appropriate name for their latest endeavour. The word “sanguine” perfectly describes the tone and sound of the four offerings here. This is a collection of bright and cordial pop/rock anthems that possess a great deal of accessibility and are definitely worth taking the time to check out.

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Graduate of NUI Maynooth's Department of English, passionate writer of fiction and creative non-fiction alike. Mad about music, movies and books. If there's anything I enjoy more than listening, watching and reading, it's writing about what I listen to, watch and read! Check me out at davecsimpson.wordpress.com, find me on Twitter @davesimpson1 or drop me a line at dave@puremzine.com