Having formed in mid-2013, Six Time Champion are a band that are still finding their feet within the music industry. Marketed as a pop punk ensemble, the Brighton based quintet’s newly released second EP, Expecting Honesty, actually tends to steer in more of a post-hardcore direction.

“Running Dry” offers an admirably heavy introduction, erupting into discordant guitars and tumultuous vocals. The attitude expressed by its tone and words is rife with discontent. It’s very unapologetic both lyrically and musically, with a fast pace throughout that doesn’t relent.

Getting off to a lighter start, “Happiness in Emptiness” blasts away with more of a classic pop punk rhythm, increasing in heaviness during the verse. Featuring further instances of loud, boisterous vocals and instruments, its percussion work is its most remarkable attribute. The rapid, thumping drum beat really makes its presence felt amid the melee of its fellow instruments.

Title track, “Expecting Honesty”, is yet another raucous post-hardcore anthem, sailing in a sea of vociferous guitars and thunderous drums. The uncompromising, punky vibe of the vocals and lyrics are commendable. Although, musically a sense of repetitiveness does begin to set in here.

The most accessible offering has to be “Dragging My Feet.” It opens with a riff that feels more accomplished and distinctive. While it maintains a strident sound, it comes with a more melodic execution that gives it a fresher flavour.

Final addition, “Separation”, has its virtues, with adept use of cymbals that resonate through the bridge and chorus. The general defiant ambience is also laudable again. However, in terms of sound, there is a general sense of falling back into the trap of repeating the same formula as earlier tracks.

Expecting Honesty does display obvious musical talent, with the rebellious attitude that exhibits an unwillingness to conform to pop norms deserving of praise. Unfortunately though, its content is sorely lacking in diversity. Overall, what Six Time Champion have crafted here isn’t bad, but what starts strong becomes a little too standard, a little too quickly.